Cairneyhill Valuation Roll 1940

Dear blog reader

Welcome to the twelfth (and final) part in a series, a list of the people, with address and occupation where known, who were connected with Cairneyhill in 1940.

(Please see a note at the end of this introduction regarding the next series particularly for my blog readers looking for their ancestors in Cairneyhill).

In 1940 there were 136 people listed (a substantial reduction on 1935) with 82 addresses specified (exactly the same as 1935!) and 22 occupations (a substantial increase on 1935) comprising 6 shop keepers, 4 small holding workers, 2 railway employees, 2 blacksmiths, 1 piggery keeper, 1 joiner, 1 doctor, 1 air raid precaution warden, 1 Church leader, 1 slaughter house keeper, 1 hall owner and 1 garage owner.

This compares with 147 people listed in 1935 (a quite substantial increase on 1930) with 82 addresses specified (again a large increase on 1930) and 15 occupations (a slight increase on 1930) comprising 6 shop keepers, 2 smiths, 1 doctor, 1 Church leader, 1 slaughter house keeper, 1 hall and rooms keeper, 1 hall keeper, 1 joiner and 1 pig keeper, 117 people listed listed in 1930 with 32 address specified and 11 occupations comprising 2 farmers, a Church minister, 1 smith, 4 shop keepers, 1 petrol pump attendant, 1 joiner and 1 weaver, 120 people listed in 1925 with 25 addresses specified, and 7 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 1 joiner, 4 shopkeepers and 1 smith, 135 people listed in 1920 with 14 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 2 joiners, 1 market gardener, 1 slaughter house keeper, 6 shop keepers, 1 station master, 1 smith and 1 weaver, 131 people listed in 1915 with 20 occupations comprising 10 shopkeepers, 2 publicans, 1 farmer, 1 Church minister, 1 smith, 2 slaughter house keepers, 1 market gardener, 1 joiner and 1 weaver, 110 people listed in 1905 with 10 occupations comprising 4 weavers, 1 publican, 1 esquire, 2 Church ministers, 1 smith and 1 shop owner, 106 people listed in 1895 with 9 occupations comprising 5 weavers, 1 Church minister, 1 blacksmith and 2 joiners,  98 people listed in 1885 with 17 occupations comprising 10 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 blacksmiths, 2 joiners and one farmer, with  75 people listed in 1875 with 22 occupations comprising 14 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 wrights, 3 farmers and one joiner, with 65 people listed in 1865 with 27 occupations comprising 22 weavers, one blacksmith, one joiner, 2 wrights and one Church minister and with 66 people listed in 1855 with 4 occupations comprising 3 weavers and one blacksmith.

Hopefully those of you with ancestors from Cairneyhill will find this list useful.

I have now reached the end of my series on the valuation rolls for Cairneyhill. My next series particularly for those people searching for their ancestors in Cairneyhill, published every 6 weeks or so, will be the censuses for Cairneyhill from 1841 through to 1911 (or even 1921 if the National Records of Scotland publishes the 1921 census within the time of writing of my census series) blogged as 2 or 3 pages of the original census returns at a go.

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Cairneyhill Main Street

William Adie, Main Street
William Allan, Yews, Main Street, Cairneyhill
William Appleford
David Bald
Richard W Bate, Nashdome
George Beattie, Cairneyhill Station
Mrs Margaret P Bedborough, Main Street
Mrs Mary Cairns, Main Street
Margaret Cook
Peter Davidson
Mrs Margaret Deas, Main Street
Arthur Devlin, Yews, Main Street
James Donald
Jean Downie
Mrs Effie Drummond, Burnbrae
Mrs Agnes Drummond, Burnbrae
Mrs Effie Drummond, Burnbank
Agnes Drummond, Main Street
Agnes Drummond, store
James Duffin, Main Street
David Duncan
Doctor John C Duncanson
Doctor John C Duncanson, smithy
Doctor John C Duncanson, Main Street
Mrs Grace G R Erskine
William Erskine
Mrs John Erskine
David Erskine
Grace Erskine, Bankview
John Erskine, glebe
Elizabeth Fairley
Elizabeth Fairley, warden’s post
James Fairley, Rose Gardens
James Fairley, Main Street
Margaret Ferguson
Robert Finlayson, West End
Robert Finalyson, Ewhurst
Robert Finlayson, coal depot, Cairneyhill station
Christina Flint
Reverend William Forbes, manse
James Forrester, Main Street
Thomas Fotheringham, Main Street
William Fotheringham
Thomas Fotheringham, Drummormie
Thomas Fotheringham, small holding number 4, Bankhead
David Fowler, small holding number 3, Bankhead
Charles Gillespie, Main Street
Ethel M Glover, Holm Cottage
Adam Hadden
David Halkett
Mrs Robert Hall, Burnside Cottage
James Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton, store
William Hepburn, Main Street
William Hill, Main Street
William D Hill
Peter Hogg, Main Street
Barbara M Howieson
Mrs Allison Hunter, smithy
William Hunter, Burnbank
James Hunter
William Hynd, shop, Main Street
John Kennedy, 1 Mansion Buildings
Michael Kirk
David Kirk, Main Street
John Laird
Jean Lawson, Main Street
William Lindsay
Thomas Lowery
Mrs Mary S Lowrie, West End
George Luke, West Lodge
Andrew Lumsden
Mrs Helen Lumsden, West End
Mrs Helen Lumsden, slaughter house
Andrew Lumsden
Janet Lumsden, Yews, Main Street
Mrs Helen Lumsden, Yews, Main Street
Robert McAllister, Bankview
James MacArthur
Christopher MacConnell
James MacDonald, Carsehill
Alexander MacDonald, Main Street
James MacDonald, Main Street
James MacDonald, Nashdome
James MacDonald, Pleasance
Norman MacDonald, Pentland View, Pleasance
James MacDonald, Cairnbank, Pleasance
William MacGuire, Main Street
Peter MacKenzie, Main Street
Mrs Mary A MacKenzie, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Marshall
Mrs Annie Matson, Ashdene
William Meikle
John Milne
John Mitchell, Main Street
James Mitchell, Bellabank
James Mitchell, Glen Cottage
Mrs Annie Morgan, Mansions
Mrs Annie Morgan, hall
John Morris, Main Street
Christina B W Patterson
Ernest Pattie, The Knowe
Archibald Penman, shop and store, Main Street
John Penrice
Alexander Philip, Ewhurst
Robert Philp, small holding number 1, Bankhead
George Reid
Sebastian Rennie
Jack Rennie
John Rennie, garage, Main Street
John Rennie, shop, Mansion House
John Robertson, Main Street
James A Robertson, Main Street
John Robertson, Catherine Place
John Robertson, joiner’s shop
Isabella G Robertson, shop
James Ross
George Russell, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Russell
John Scott, Bellabank
Donald S Sellar, Main Street
William Sharp, Yews, Main Street
Donald Smith
William Stewart
Thomas Templeman
Thomas Thomson, Mansions
John Thomson, 4 Mansion Buildings
David Thomson, Threshend
Thomas Thomson, Threshend
Mrs Christina Watt, Erskine Cottage
Alexander Watt
Walter Weir, Yews, Main Street
Hugh Wildridge, piggery, Braefoot
John Wilson
James Wishart, small holdings number 2, Bankhead
Alexander Wright, Main Street
James Wright
Mrs Margaret Wright, Batavia Cottage


Death of Centenarian: Catherine Duncanson

THE FIFE FREE PRESS, SATURDAY, 10 FEBRUARY 1945

BURNTISLAND LOCAL NOTES AND NEWS: DEATH OF CENTENARIAN

Our Grand Old Lady, who was in her 102nd year, Miss Catherine Duncanson, passed away early on Monday morning in a local nursing home.

Miss Duncanson was a native of Cairneyhill, near Dunfermline, and although most of her working years were spent in Glasgow, she always maintained a strong interest in her native district.

Main Street, Cairneyhill

Fully twelve years ago she removed from Glasgow and came to reside with her niece, Miss Helen Duncanson, Heriot Gardens, and up to quite recently enjoyed good health and all her faculties. Indeed when she celebrated her 101st birth in November last, she was a wonderful old lady, hale and hearty, able to write her own letters (and she had many correspondents), and an untiring knitter.

Since the outbreak of the war her hobby was knitting socks and comforts for the men in the Forces, and she made hundreds of such articles.

She was a staunch and devoted Church-woman, and even after passing her century, attended the services at the Erskine UF Church.

Before her death, Miss Duncanson had been in the nursing home for a few weeks.

Cairneyhill Mink Part 3

Dear blog reader

Here is the 3rd and final (unless I find any other curiosities about this Cairneyhill business) part in my mini-series on mink in Cairneyhill ….

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DUNDEE COURIER, FRIDAY 19 MAY 1950

SHE’S BOSS AT THE FUR COAT FARM

At the Rawlence’s smallholding at Burnside, Cairneyhill,near Dunfermline, is a sight that would turn any woman green with envy.

Scrambling about behind the wire of roomy cages are a score of little animals that might have strayed out of a Walt Disney cartoon.

They range in colour from a rich dark brown to black. They have bushy tails, a perky expression and a waistcoat of slate-blue fur.

They’re minks – fur coats on four legs valued at £300.

Ex WAAF, Miss Norma Rawlence, is the boss here. She looks after her valuable livestock with special care, although at the moment mink farming is a sideline.

Norma Rawlence feeds a tit-bit to one of the minks.

Norma has to devote most of her time to the ordinary business of the smallholding. Her only assistants are her two brothers, Ted and Bill. They are employed at Crombie with the Admiralty and don’t have a great deal of time to devote to the work.

It was Bill’s idea to start breeding mink. A pal of his in the navy told him how to go about it.

At the beginning of their venture the Rawlence family bought six female and three male minks, each costing £25.

So far they can’t say it’s been a paying proposition. But they hope the next few litters will recoup them.

‘DEARS – BUT THEY BITE’

A ‘Courier and Advertiser’ reporter, who called at Burnside, found Norma feeding what she calls ‘her dears’. But they’re very fierce and must be handled cautiously.

‘We’ve all had bad bites’ said Norma ‘but nothing serious’.

‘I can’t say we’ve been very lucky so far with our stock’ she added.

‘Minks breed only once a year. Only two of the first litter of 13 survived. And when I saw the second lot I could have cried – 14 males and one female.’

‘We sold the males – each pelt bought about £5. But naturally we want females to increase our stock’.

Fortunately minks are cheap to feed. They love such things as fish heads and vary their diet with fresh vegetables.

Norma says that at one time about 70 pelts were required to make a fur coat. But now that coats are longer more are required.

Before the war a mink coat cost anything up to £1500. Today you may have to give as much as £4000.

Mink never goes out of fashion. When a man makes a fortune he buys his wife a mink coat. This keeps up the price.

Queen Victoria started the mink fashion. She wore a mink coat on her honeymoon.

And how about a mink coat for Miss Rawlence herself? Norma ‘couldn’t care less’.

Cairneyhill Mink Part 2

Dear blog reader

Quite some time ago I published a blog post on the mink farm that used to be at Cairneyhill. I have since discovered further information to be featured in this present blog post and another blog post, including, this time, a photo of the mink!

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DUNDEE EVENING TELEGRAPH, FRIDAY 7 JANUARY 1949

DOWN ON THE MINK FARM IN FIFE

Half a pound of condemned meat, fish, cereals, vegetables, tomato juice, and five drops of cod liver oil – all mixed up in one dish. A peculiar mixture, but delicious fare for a healthy young mink.

On this daily diet, ten young mink at Cairneyhill, near Dunfermline, are thriving and growing fur which some woman would be proud to wear.

This small farm was started just over a year ago. It is in charge of the part-owner, Miss Norma Rawlence, whose home is at 11 Main Road, Crombie. With her two brothers, she shared in the initial outlay of about £250.

Everything is now going smoothly in the little herd, but they have had their ups and downs like every other family.

Originally they numbered nine, but one died from an unknown cause. When 18 young were born in May, the Rawlences thought they were well on the way to building up their farm.

All but two – a male and a female – died.

The wife of a mink breeder in Oregon, USA, was holidaying in Fife. She heard of the venture at Cairneyhill and visited Miss Rawlence. She suggested the young had died because their diet had been changed.

Cairneyhill Mink

When rearing their young, the mink get a hard boiled egg between three every day, in addition to their normal diet.

Everything has gone well since, and the minks are happy captives, especially in biting cold weather when everyone else is shivering.

But care has to be taken that their bed boxes are dry and draughtless, otherwise they contract pneumonia and die overnight.

The mink don’t like hot weather. During the heat wave last July they wilted and were uncomfortable until a biscuit tinful of cold water was put in each of their cages. Within seconds they were swimming in the tins.

‘We have had many enquiries from people who would like to keep mink’, said Miss Rawlence, ‘but none so far as I know has started a farm. The initial outlay is the drawback with mink I think’.

‘We hope to get more young next May and be able to sell some pelts’.

Miss Rawlence’s ambition is to breed mutation mink. They are freak animals which can be made almost any colour. Pastel blue is her choice.

Cairneyhill Valuation Roll 1935

Dear blog reader

Welcome to the eleventh part in a series, a list of the people, with address and occupation where known, who were connected with Cairneyhill in 1935.

In 1935 there were 147 people (a quite substantial increase on 1930) with 82 addresses specified (again a large increase on 1930) and 15 occupations (a slight increase on 1930) comprising 6 shop keepers, 2 smiths, 1 doctor, 1 Church leader, 1 slaughter house keeper, 1 hall and rooms keeper, 1 hall keeper, 1 joiner and 1 pig keeper.

This compares with 117 people listed listed in 1930 with 32 address specified and 11 occupations comprising 2 farmers, a Church minister, 1 smith, 4 shop keepers, 1 petrol pump attendant, 1 joiner and 1 weaver, 120 people listed in 1925 with 25 addresses specified, and 7 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 1 joiner, 4 shopkeepers and 1 smith, 135 people listed in 1920 with 14 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 2 joiners, 1 market gardener, 1 slaughter house keeper, 6 shop keepers, 1 station master, 1 smith and 1 weaver, 131 people listed in 1915 with 20 occupations comprising 10 shopkeepers, 2 publicans, 1 farmer, 1 Church minister, 1 smith, 2 slaughter house keepers, 1 market gardener, 1 joiner and 1 weaver, 110 people listed in 1905 with 10 occupations comprising 4 weavers, 1 publican, 1 esquire, 2 Church ministers, 1 smith and 1 shop owner, 106 people listed in 1895 with 9 occupations comprising 5 weavers, 1 Church minister, 1 blacksmith and 2 joiners,  98 people listed in 1885 with 17 occupations comprising 10 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 blacksmiths, 2 joiners and one farmer, with  75 people listed in 1875 with 22 occupations comprising 14 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 wrights, 3 farmers and one joiner, with 65 people listed in 1865 with 27 occupations comprising 22 weavers, one blacksmith, one joiner, 2 wrights and one Church minister and with 66 people listed in 1855 with 4 occupations comprising 3 weavers and one blacksmith.

Hopefully those of you with ancestors from Cairneyhill will find this list useful.

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Cairneyhill Main Street

William Adie, Main Street
Alexander Allan, West End, Nether Pitdinnie
William Allan, Yews, Main Street
William Appleford
George Armour
Thomas Arnott, Erskine Cottage
William Arnott
Reuben Arthur
David Bald
Arthur Baysting, Nether Pitdinnie
Mrs Margaret P Bedborough, Main Street
James Brown
Thomas Brown, Yews, Main Street
Margaret Cook
David Cook
Peter Davidson
David Deas, Yews, Main Street
William Deas, Yews, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Deas, Main Street
James Donald
Andrew Downie
Jean Downie
Philip J Drinnan
Mrs E Drummond, Burnbrae
John Drummond, Burnbrae
Mrs E Drummond, Mansions
Agnes Drummond, Main Street
Agnes Drummond, store
James Duffin, Main Street
David Duncan
Doctor J C Duncanson, smithy
Doctor J C Dncanson, Main Street
Mrs Grace G R Erskine, Myrend
Mrs Grace G R Erskine, Nether Pitdinnie
Donald R Erskine
William Erskine
Mrs John Erskine
David Erskine
Grace Erskine, Bankview
John Erskine, Glebe
James Fairley, Nether Pitdinnie
Elizabeth Fairley, Main Street
James Fairley, Rose Gardens
James Fairley, Main Street
James Feeney
Margaret G Ferguson, Main Street
Robert Finlayson, West End
Robert Finlayson, Ewhurst
Christina Flint
Reverend William Forbes, manse
James Forrester, Main Street
Thomas Fotheringham
Anne Fotheringham, Drummormie
Thomas Fotheringham, Drummormie
John Fraser
Ethel M Glover, Holm Cottage
Charles Grierson, Nether Pitdinnie
David Halkett, Main Street
James Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton, Main Street
Alexander Hamilton, store
William Hepburn, Main Street
William Hill, Main Street
Peter Hogg, Main Street
Barbara M Howieson
Mrs Allison Hunter, smithy
James Hunter
William Hynd, shop
William Hynd, Main Street
John Kennedy, 1 Mansion Buildings
Michael Kirk
David Kirk, Main Street
Thomas Lamont
Jean Lawson, Main Street
William Lindsay
Mrs David Lloyd
Thomas Lowery
Mrs Mary S Lowrie, West End
Mrs Helen Lumsden, West End
Mrs Helen Lumsden, slaughter house
Andrew Lumsden, Yews, Main Street
Jane Lumsden, Yews, Main Street
Robert MacAllister, Bankview
John MacArthur, Burnside Cottage
Christopher MacConnell
James MacDonald, Carsehill
Alexander MacDonald
James MacDonald, Ashdene
James MacDonald, Nashdome
William MacDonald, Nashdome
James MacDonald, Pleasance
Normand MacDonald, Pentland View, Pleasance
James MacDonald, Cairnbank, Pleasance
William MacGuire
Peter MacKenzie, Main Street
Mrs Mary A MacKenzie, Main Street
Mrs Christina MacNair, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Marshall
John Matson, Ashdene
William Meikle
John Milne
John Mitchell, Main Street
James Mitchell, Bellabank
James Mitchell, Glen Cottage
David Morgan, Mansions
David Morgan, hall and rooms
John Morris, Main Street
William D Oliphant
Charlotte Paterson
Christina B W Patterson
Ernest Pattie, The Knowe
Archibald Penman, shop and store, Main Street
John Penrice
Alexander Philip, Ewhurst
Mrs James Philp, hall
John W Philp, Main Street
William Philp, Calderwood
George Reid
John Rennie, Mansion House
John Rennie, stores
John Rennie, Yews, Main Street
John Robertson, Burnside Cottage
John Robertson, Catherine Place
John Robertson, joiner’s shop
Isabella Robertson, shop
James Ross
Robert Ross, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Russell
John Scott, Bellabank
Donald S Sellar
William Sellars
Donald Smith
Thomas Templeman
David Thomson
John Thomson, 4 Mansion Buildings
James Thomson, Mansions
David Thomson, Threshend
Thomas Thomson, Threshend
John Watt, Main Street
Mrs Mary Watt
Hugh Wildridge, Braefoot
Hugh Wildridge, piggery
John Wilson
James Wishart
Alexander Wright, Main Street
Mrs Margaret Wright, Batavia Cottage

Death Of James Morris Cairneyhill Doctor

DUNDEE EVENING TELEGRAPH, MONDAY 2ND MAY 1910

FIFE DOCTOR – ONE OF THE OLDEST IN SCOTLAND – DIES AT DUNFERMLINE TODAY

Dr James Morris, Dunfermline, died this morning. By his death the burgh has lost one of its best-known and most respected inhabitants.

Doctor James Morris

Dr Morris was a familiar figure in the streets of the city for a period of over sixty years. During his long life he was blessed with a robust constitution, which enabled him to carry on his practice almost until the last. A few months ago he was laid aside, and gradually the infirmity of old age became more pronounced, and the frame slowly weakened.

The deceased gentleman was probably the oldest medical practitioner in Scotland. He was born in the village of Cairneyhill, and was in his 84th year. About 71 years ago he began his career in a chemist’s shop in Dunfermline. Some years afterwards he went to Glasgow, and there studied for medicine, qualifying in the western city as a physician and surgeon. He returned to his native county of Fife, and opened the practice of his profession in Dunfermline in the year 1849, so that for an unbroken period of 61 years he was a medical practitioner in the West of Fife burgh. In the year 1860 he was appointed police surgeon, and six years later parochial medical office. These offices he held until infirmity forced him to keep indoors, and he was succeeded by his son-in-law, Dr A J MacGregor. ‘The Doctor’ as he was familiarly known, kept in harness until the end. His activity altogether belied his great age, and in all weathers he was out and amongst his patients, by whom he was beloved as a dear friend and counsellor.

In his long career he had many unique experiences. He had just returned to Dunfermline from Glasgow when he was called upon to deal with an epidemic of the dreaded cholera, a period which is yet referred to by the older inhabitants. Later, after he became medical officer, while treating cases of typhus, he was himself affected.

Some years ago the deceased enumerated interesting figures dealing with the different cases with which he was associated. He was concerned in over 10,000 vaccinations, while the patients upon whom he was from time to time in attendance reached a grand total of between 50,000 and 60,000. The doctor was also responsible for the lives of individuals who would have constituted a fairly large township. It was computed that during his practice in Dunfermline and district he was in attendance at not far short of 6000 births. The number of miles he traveled it would be difficult to estimate, but from a figure given by himself several years ago the distance could not have been very far short of 600,000 miles.

When Dr Morris reached the fiftieth year of his practice in Dunfermline his fellow citizens and brother medical practitioners recognised his jubilee in tangible and pleasing manner. Allusion was then made to the affection with which he was regarded and the esteem he was held in. In many a home in Dunfermline his death is regretted. He was a busy man in his profession, and had little time for other concerns, although the public health of the burgh had always his regard. He was a close personal friend of the late Sir Henry Campbell Bannerman, and frequently was one of his platform.

The deceased is survived by his wife and a large family. One son is practising in South Africa, and Mr J S Soutar, procurator-fiscal, is a son-in-law.

John Duncanson at Burntisland Church

THE COURIER, FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1905

BURNTISLAND ELDER’S LONG RECORD

John Duncanson

The annual social meeting of Erskine UF congregation, Burntisland, held last night, was largely attended, and was the occasion of a substantial presentation to Mr John Duncanson, the oldest member of Session, in recognition of services to the Church extending over fifty years.

Mr Duncanson, who is a native of Cairneyhill, has been forty years an elder and more than fifty years clerk and treasurer to the congregation, and for a like period Sabbath School teacher, discharging all the duties with exemplary diligence and faithfulness. In acknowledgement of his long and zealous services he received gifts consisting of a purse of sovereigns and a framed illuminated address, while a gold and diamond brooch and chain were bestowed on Mrs Duncanson, who, like her husband, does much useful work in the Church and in the community.

Ex-provost Strachan, a brother elder, made the presentation, and Mr Gilmour, solicitor, read the address, which was subscribed by the two ministers and several office-bearers in name of the congregation.

Mr and Mrs Duncanson replied in feeling terms, and were warmly received.

The minister of the Church, Rev J Brown Young, bore his testimony, and the Revs J Gilmour, Cowdenbeath, and Benjamin Martin, Leslie spoke of the high Christian character of Mr Duncanson and his efficient service as a member of presbytery. Some fine music was discoursed by the choir, and solos and duets were also ably rendered, the whole proceedings being of an interesting character.

Career of Rev James Gilmour

THE COURIER, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1908

COWDENBEATH MINISTER FOR GATESHEAD – A VIGOROUS CLERICAL CAREER

Rev James Gilmour

The Rev James Gilmour, Cowdenbeath, who has decided to accept a unanimous call from the Brighton Avenue Church congregation, Gateshead, Newcastle-on-Tyne, has been pastor of the Cairns UF Church for nearly a quarter of a century.

He was born at Cairneyhill, near Dunfermline, and after a successful course at Edinburgh University he entered the Divinity Hall of the United Presbyterian Church, leaving with the degree of BD.  After being licensed  he became assistant to the late Professor Hyslop in Helensburgh.  Here he remained for two years.  In 1885 the UP Presbytery of Dunfermline placed him in charge of the mission in Cowdenbeath, which had been newly commenced as a preaching station.  Shortly afterwards, it was formed into a Church, and Mr Gilmour was chosen as pastor.  His labours in the busy mining centre have been very fruitful.  During his stay a Church and a manse at a total cost of £3000 have been built, and these are now entirely free of debt.  There are over 350 members in the congregation.

In the neighbouring village of Kelty Mr Gilmour’s work is apparent, and an extension charge there is fully equipped and a hall secured at a cost of £800.  Mr Gilmour has been for three years clerk to the Dunfermline and Kinross presbytery.  In Christian endeavour and in temperance he is an outstanding personage, and is also an active worker on the Cowdenbeath Vigilance Committee.  An uncompromising opponent of the new Gothenburg system of public-houses, he has on many occasions, in various parts of the country, denounced the principle, as he terms it, of ‘bolstering up the drink traffic and making it look respectable’.

New Railway in 1906

EDINBURGH EVENING NEWS, SATURDAY, JUNE 30, 1906

THE NEW KINCARDINE AND DUNFERMLINE RAILWAY

Railway

The above sketch shows the new branch of the North British Railway which links up Kincardine-On-Forth with Dunfermline, and which will be opened for public traffic on Monday first.

Yesterday the line was subjected to a Board of Trade inspection, and today, through the courtesy of the North British Railway Company, a number of press representatives had an opportunity of going over the latest addition to the company’s now extensive railways. It is not so very long ago since the Alloa and Kincardine branch was inaugurated, and though this proved a great boon, the want of railway communication further east in that direction was always felt. The Edinburgh, Alloa, and Stirling line runs further north, almost parallel, but it was too far distant to be of any service to the population on the shores of the Forth.

To reach the ancient and Royal burgh of Culross (which has come into the public eye of late through discoveries made at the Abbey) the coach had to be employed from Kincardine on the one hand, and Dunfermline on the other, but in these days one likes to regard coaching as a luxury rather than a necessity. The attempts, therefore, to boom the village as a holiday resort were never very successful, but it has charms that appeal to those who like a quiet restful holiday, and now that railway facilities are at hand it may take a fresh lease of life. Picturesquely situated on the banks of the Forth, the village is not without interest historically.

Torryburn and Cairneyhill are the other stations on the eleven miles long line, and a junction is effected with the Dunfermline and Charlestown railway. The line, which is a single one, runs along the foreshore for some distance on an embankment.

Cairneyhill Valuation Roll 1930

Dear blog reader

Welcome to the tenth part in a series, a list of the people, with address and occupation where known, who were connected with Cairneyhill in 1930.

In 1930 there were 117 people listed (a slight drop on 1925) with 32 address specified (a substantial increase on 1925) and 11 occupations (another increase on 1925) comprising 2 farmers, a Church minister, 1 smith, 4 shop keepers, 1 petrol pump attendant, 1 joiner and 1 weaver.

This compares with 120 people listed in 1925 with 25 addresses specified, and 7 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 1 joiner, 4 shopkeepers and 1 smith, 135 people listed in 1920 with 14 occupations comprising 1 Church minister, 2 joiners, 1 market gardener, 1 slaughter house keeper, 6 shop keepers, 1 station master, 1 smith and 1 weaver, 131 people listed in 1915 with 20 occupations comprising 10 shopkeepers, 2 publicans, 1 farmer, 1 Church minister, 1 smith, 2 slaughter house keepers, 1 market gardener, 1 joiner and 1 weaver, 110 people listed in 1905 with 10 occupations comprising 4 weavers, 1 publican, 1 esquire, 2 Church ministers, 1 smith and 1 shop owner, 106 people listed in 1895 with 9 occupations comprising 5 weavers, 1 Church minister, 1 blacksmith and 2 joiners,  98 people listed in 1885 with 17 occupations comprising 10 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 blacksmiths, 2 joiners and one farmer, with  75 people listed in 1875 with 22 occupations comprising 14 weavers, 2 Church ministers, 2 wrights, 3 farmers and one joiner, with 65 people listed in 1865 with 27 occupations comprising 22 weavers, one blacksmith, one joiner, 2 wrights and one Church minister and with 66 people listed in 1855 with 4 occupations comprising 3 weavers and one blacksmith.

Hopefully those of you with ancestors from Cairneyhill will find this list useful.

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William Adie, Main Street
Alexander Allan, Nether Pitdinnie
Mrs Jeanie Allan
William Appleford
Thomas Arnott, Erskine Cottage
William Arnott
Reuben Arthur
David Bald
James Brown
Thomas Brown
Walter Colquhoun
Margaret Cook
David Cook
Peter Davidson
David Deas
Mrs Margaret Deas
James Donald
Jean Downie
John Drummond, Burnbrae
Agnes Drummond
Margaret Drysdale
James Duffin
John Erskine, farmer, Myrend
John Erskine, Nether Pitdinnie
William Erskine
Christina Erskine, farmer
Grace Erskine, Bankview
John Erskine, glebe
James Fairley, Nether Pitdinnie
Elizabeth Fairley
Margaret G Ferguson
Robert Finlayson, Main Street
Alexander Flint
Reverend William Forbes, manse
James Forrester
Thomas Fotheringham
William Fotheringham
Anne Fotheringham
James Fox
John Fraser
Norman Fraser
Ethel M Glover, Holm Cottage
David Halkett
William Hill
John Hodge
Peter Hogg
Katharine Howieson
James Hunter, smithy
William Hynd, shop
James Kennedy
David Kirk, Main Street
Michael Kirk
Charles Kirk
William Lauchlan, Nether Pitdinnie
Jean Lawson
William Lindsay
David Lloyd
Thomas Lowrie
Andrew Lumsden
Robert MacAlister, Bankview
John MacArthur, Burnside
Christopher MacConnell
James MacDonald
Alexander MacDonald
Mrs Agnes MacDonald
Mrs Mary A MacKenzie, Main Street
Mrs Christina MacNair, Main Street
William MacQuire
Mrs Margaret Marshall
John Matson
William Meikle
Mrs Mary Millar, shop
D Millar, petrol pump
John Milne
James Mitchell, Bellabank
David Morgan
John Morris
William D Oliphant
Mrs Helen T Paterson
Charlotte Paterson
Ernest Pattie
Archibald Penman, shop, Main Street
John Penrice
James Philip, West End
Mrs James Philp, hall
John W Philp, Main Street
William Philp, Calderwood
Alexander Philp, Main Street
George Reid
John Rennie
Sebastian Rennie
John Robertson, Burnside
John Robertson, Catherine Place
John Robertson, joiner
Isabella Robertson, shop
Charles Robertson
Robert Ross
William Russell
William Sellars
Donald Smart
Daniel Smith
Walter Stewart
William Templeman
John Thomson
David Thomson
Thomas Thomson
William Watson, loomshop
John Watt
Mrs Mary Watt
Charles White
Hugh Wildridge, Burnbrae
John Wilson
James Wishart
Edward Wright, Nether Pitdinnie
Alexander Wright
A Wright
Margaret Wright, Batavia Cottage
James Wright, Main Street
William Young